Background - 2011 Fast Fact Sheet

Background

In 1988, the first Missing Children’s Annual Reference Report was produced to provide police departments, government representatives, missing children agencies, media, and the public with information regarding missing children reports as well as National Missing Children Services programs, services and initiatives. In 2011, National Missing Children Services was renamed to National Missing Children Operations (NMCO). Alongside the National Missing Persons and Unidentified Remains Operations (NMPURO), these two divisions make up the National Centre for Missing Persons and Unidentified Remains (NCMPUR), a distinct part of the Canadian Police Centre for Missing and Exploited Children (CPCMEC). With this change, annual reports are now being produced as fast fact sheets. 

Interpreting the Data

This fast fact sheet has been prepared using numbers provided within the Canadian Police Information Centre’s (CPIC) 2011 Missing Persons Statistical Report.

It is important to note that these numbers illustrate the number of missing person transactions in CPIC, rather than the number of missing individuals. Transactions include repeat runaways and situations where a single instance of a missing person may be entered and deleted multiple times by different agencies over a period of time (eg. a child goes missing with the initial report being filed with one police service, however, investigation indicates  the file falls within another police service’s jurisdiction).

The attached tables include data provided by CPIC that are more indicative of the number of actual missing persons reports. Although the CPIC program that produces this data attempts to remove duplications, it is not currently possible to know the variability caused by these additional factors given the available data. The number of CPIC transactions are point in time and change dynamically as records are added, modified or removed. It is also important to note that CPIC data is subjective to a degree as the person who enters the data is left to determine which “probable cause” category they believe the missing person falls into. As well, although both parental abduction (with custody order and with no custody order), runaway, and the other categories, are defined in CPIC as applying only to children, subjects under 18, and youth respectively, adults are sometimes entered into these categories.

While NCMPUR anticipates that future fast fact sheets will be in a similar format to the one produced this year, the categories may change in future years as CPIC adds more data fields to provide a more comprehensive picture of the missing person report. As the statistics become more descriptive, it is important to note that backward comparisons to previous years may not be possible.

Fast Fact Sheet - Missing Adult Reports by Province, Profile, and Gender for 2011
Provinces
(Population in 2011)
Abduction by stranger Accident Wandered Off Parental Abduction with Custody Parental Abduction without Custody Runaway Unknown Other Total
Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male
Yukon Territory
(34,700)
    1     1         2   2 2 1   9
North West Territory
(43,700)
                      3 4 3 1 1 12
Nunavut Territory
(33,300)
      1   1           1   1   1 5
British Columbia
(4,573,300)
7 9 1 33 136 297   1 1   433 469 1969 2614 255 371 6616
Alberta
(3,779,400)
1 3   4 40 111         106 97 159 247 9 8 663
Saskatchewan
(1,057,900)
  1   1 11 25         106 138 531 858 51 85 1928
Manitoba
(1,250,600)
      1 19 37       1 137 165 264 288 18 31 961
Ontario
(13,373,000)
8 4 4 15 103 284 2 1 3 1 593 657 1574 1865 316 424 5854
Quebec
(7,979,700)
5 8 2 5 45 96 3 2 3 1 193 526 327 671 128 305 2330
New Brunswick
(755,500)
      1 8 16         23 44 54 92 11 31 280
Prince Edward Island
(145,900)
                      2   5   2 9
Nova Scotia
(945,400)
      1 10 24         6 19 51 89 37 58 295
Newfoundland and Labrador
(510,600)
          5         5 6 34 62 2 2 116
Total 21 25 8 62 372 897 5 4 7 3 1603 2127 4989 6797 829 1319 19068

FAST FACTS:

  • 66% of missing adult reports are removed within 24 hours, while 85% are removed within a week

*Data subject to caveats outlined in the Interpreting the Data section. Forty Three (43) missing adult reports were not included in this table as there was an invalid/no profile for probable cause of going missing.

Fast Fact Sheet - Missing Children and Youth Reports by Province, Profile, and Gender for 2011
Provinces
(Population in 2011)
Abduction by stranger Accident Wandered Off Parental Abduction with Custody Parental Abduction without Custody Runaway Unknown Other Total
Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male
Yukon Territory
(34,700)
                    13 6 2       21
North West Territory
(43,700)
                    18 9 3 1     31
Nunavut Territory
(33,300)
                          1     1
British Columbia
(4,573,300)
3 1 4 4 29 36 12 9 10 7 2454 1645 2516 1843 395 299 9267
Alberta
(3,779,400)
  3     9 11 8 4 4 3 2207 1647 218 181 24 17 4336
Saskatchewan
(1,057,900)
1       4 5   1 3 1 1445 771 301 225 12 9 2778
Manitoba
(1,250,600)
    1 2 3 6   1 3 6 2874 1094 1194 439 51 12 5686
Ontario
(13,373,000)
4 2 5 3 87 103 8 6 11 6 7762 5721 1665 1200 403 318 17304
Quebec
(7,979,700)
3 5   2 5 17 9 3 10 16 1805 2288 468 484 226 218 5559
New Brunswick
(755,500)
1 2   1   1 1   1 1 247 224 38 31   6 554
Prince Edward Island
(145,900)
                    8 8 1 1 1   19
Nova Scotia
(945,400)
    1 1 1 1 1       632 270 18 16 15 14 970
Newfoundland and Labrador
(510,600)
        1           96 15 58 20 1 1 192
Total 12 13 11 13 139 180 39 24 42 40 19561 13698 6482 4442 1128 894 46718

FAST FACTS:

  • 63% of missing children/youth reports were removed within 24 hours, while 86% are removed within a week
  • Youth between the age of 14-15 make up 45% of missing children/youth reports

*Data subject to caveats outlined in the Interpreting the Data section. Four (4) missing children reports were not included in this table as there was an invalid/no profile for probable cause of going missing.